Generic Name: furosemide (fur OH se mide brand Names: Lasix, Diaqua-2, Lo-Aqua, medically reviewed on December 27, 2017. Lasix (furosemide) is a loop diuretic (water pill) that prevents your body from absorbing too much salt. This allows the salt to instead be passed in your urine. Lasix is used to treat fluid retention ( edema ) in people with congestive heart failure, liver disease, or a kidney disorder such as nephrotic syndrome. Lasix is also used to treat high blood does lasix cause weight loss pressure (hypertension). You should not use Lasix if you does lasix cause weight loss are unable to urinate. Do not take more Lasix than your recommended dose. High doses of furosemide may cause irreversible hearing loss. Before using Lasix, tell your doctor if you have kidney disease, enlarged prostate, urination problems, cirrhosis or other liver disease, an electrolyte imbalance, high cholesterol, gout, lupus, diabetes, or an allergy to sulfa drugs. Tell your doctor if you have recently had an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) or any type of scan does lasix cause weight loss using a radioactive dye that is injected into your veins. Do not take more of this medication than is recommended. If you are being treated for high blood pressure, keep using this medication even if you feel fine. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. Before taking this medicine, you should not use Lasix if you are allergic to furosemide, or: if you are unable to urinate. To make sure Lasix is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: kidney disease; liquid lasix enlarged prostate, bladder obstruction, urination problems; cirrhosis or other liver disease; an electrolyte imbalance (such as low levels of potassium or magnesium in your blood high cholesterol or triglycerides. Tell your doctor if you have an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) or any type of scan using a radioactive dye that is injected into your veins. Both contrast liquid lasix dyes and furosemide can harm your kidneys. It is not known whether Lasix will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medicine. Furosemide can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby.

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Nebulized lasix

Introduction, the population-based prevalence of adults reporting breathlessness that limits activities of daily life is 10 (. Currow., 2009 ; Bowden., 2011 ; Ekström., 2016 ). Breathlessness is ubiquitous in nebulized lasix advanced disease across a range of both malignant and non-malignant diagnoses (. Ekström., 2016 for example, Mullerova. (2014) reported that 75 of adults with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (copd) experienced physical activity-limiting breathlessness. Notwithstanding the high prevalence and burden of breathlessness in the general population and among adults with advanced disease, effective management of this symptom remains a challenge for healthcare providers. For instance, Sundh and Ekström (2016) found that 57 of adults with copd experienced persistent and disabling physical activity-related breathlessness despite treatment of their underlying pathophysiology with inhaled triple therapy. With the possible exception of low-dose systemic opioids (. Ekström., 2015 ; Barnes., 2016 which are rarely prescribed for relief of breathlessness (. Ahmadi., 2016 there is currently no evidence-based pharmacotherapy indicated for use in the management of chronic breathlessness syndrome, a distinct clinical entity recently defined as breathlessness that persists despite optimal treatment of the underlying pathophysiology and that results in disability (. Johnson., 2017 ). Several studies have demonstrated that inhalation of nebulized furosemide (40 mg) compared with nebulized.9 saline decreased intensity ratings of perceived breathlessness provoked by a variety of respiratory stimuli at rest in healthy adults (. Nishino., 2000 ; Minowa., 2002 ; Moosavi., 2007 ) or by constant-load cycle endurance exercise testing in copd (. Ong., 2004 ; Jensen., 2008 ). A randomized, double-blind, parallel group study. Sheikh Motahar Vahedi. (2013) similarly reported that nebulized furosemide (40 mg) was superior to nebulized.9 saline as an adjunct to conventional therapies for alleviating breathlessness at rest in adults admitted to the emergency department with an acute exacerbation of copd. Although the mechanisms underlying relief of breathlessness with nebulized furosemide remain unclear, changes in the activity of pulmonary stretch receptors (PSRs) that provide sensory feedback information on lung expansion via the vagus nerve to cortical and subcortical regions of the brain implicated in the perception. Davenport and Vovk, 2009 ; Nishino, 2009 ). To this end, Sudo. (2000) showed that inhalation of nebulized furosemide enhanced the activity of slowly adapting PSRs (SARs) and suppressed the activity of rapidly adapting PSRs (RARs) during lung inflation in anesthetized rats. In keeping with these observations, Nehashi. (2001) reported that nebulized furosemide inhibited respiratory distress induced by airway occlusion in anesthetized cats. (1998) similarly reported that lung expansion inhibited respiratory distress induced by airway occlusion in a dose-related manner and that bilateral vagotomy totally abolished this effect, presumably via loss of sensory feedback from PSRs. On the basis of these observations and the purported role of PSRs in the neuromodulation of breathlessness in humans (. Manning., 1992 ; Flume., 1996 ; Vovk and Binks, 2007 it has been proposed that nebulized furosemide alleviates breathlessness by altering pulmonary vagal afferent activity from PSRs, presumably mimicking greater tidal volume (VT) expansion ( Nishino., 2000 ; Sudo. However, relief of breathlessness following inhalation of nebulized furosemide is not a universal finding, with a growing number of studies reporting no statistically significant effect of nebulized furosemide (4080 mg) compared with nebulized.9 saline on intensity ratings of perceived breathlessness: during arm exercise tests. Thus, the efficacy of nebulized furosemide on breathlessness remains uncertain and requires further investigation.

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